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dc.contributor.authorKoycu, Berrak Celik
dc.contributor.authorImirzalioglu, Pervin
dc.date.accessioned2023-08-10T08:09:59Z
dc.date.available2023-08-10T08:09:59Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.issn1059-941Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11727/10222
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Daily consumption of food and drink creates rapid temperature changes in the oral cavity. Heat transfer and thermal stress caused by temperature changes in restored teeth may damage the hard and soft tissue components, resulting in restoration failure. This study evaluates the temperature distribution and related thermal stress on mandibular molar teeth restored via three indirect restorations using three-dimensional (3D) finite element analysis (FEA). Materials and Methods: A 3D finite element model was constructed of a mandibular first molar and included enamel, dentin, pulp, surrounding bone, and indirect class 2 restorations of type 2 dental gold alloy, ceramic, and composite resin. A transient thermal FEA was performed to investigate the temperature distribution and the resulting thermal stress after simulated temperature changes from 36 degrees C to 4 or 60 degrees C for a 2-second time period. Results: The restoration models had similar temperature distributions at 2 seconds in both the thermal conditions. Compared with 60 degrees C exposure, the 4 degrees C condition resulted in thermal stress values of higher magnitudes. At 4oC, the highest stress value observed was tensile stress (56 to 57 MPa), whereas at 60 degrees C, the highest stress value observed was compressive stress (42 to 43 MPa). These stresses appeared at the cervical region of the lingual enamel. The thermal stress at the restoration surface and resin cement showed decreasing order of magnitude as follows: composite > gold > ceramic, in both thermal conditions. Conclusions: The properties of the restorative materials do not affect temperature distribution at 2 seconds in restored teeth. The pulpal temperature is below the threshold for vital pulp tissue (42 degrees C). Temperature changes generate maximum thermal stress at the cervical region of the enamel. With the highest thermal expansion coefficient, composite resin restorations exhibit higher stress patterns than ceramic and gold restorations.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.relation.isversionof10.1111/jopr.12397en_US
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/closedAccessen_US
dc.subjectOral temperature changesen_US
dc.subjectthermal stress distributionen_US
dc.subjectfinite element analysisen_US
dc.subjectinlay restorationsen_US
dc.titleHeat Transfer and Thermal Stress Analysis of a Mandibular Molar Tooth Restored by Different Indirect Restorations Using a Three-Dimensional Finite Element Methoden_US
dc.typearticleen_US
dc.relation.journalJOURNAL OF PROSTHODONTICS-IMPLANT ESTHETIC AND RECONSTRUCTIVE DENTISTRYen_US
dc.identifier.volume26en_US
dc.identifier.issue5en_US
dc.identifier.startpage460en_US
dc.identifier.endpage473en_US
dc.identifier.wos000405822000017en_US
dc.identifier.scopus2-s2.0-84954270977en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1532-849Xen_US
dc.contributor.pubmedID26618930en_US
dc.relation.publicationcategoryMakale - Uluslararası Hakemli Dergien_US


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